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Keeping Current Matters

Monday, July 28, 2008

Stone harbor Beach Front Home has 3 weeks available in August!

This has been a banner year for rentals. Even in tough times, people will not give up their vacation at the shore. Stone Harbor is just a few hours drive from Philadelphia, New York and Maryland. Come see us!

If you want to take a last minute vacation,we do have places still available depending on the weeks you need. Please call 800.708.5792

We have a huge 4 bedroom,5 bath beach front home with August weeks still available. Please give me a call at 800.708.5792 for more information.

Enormous living space here!family friendly layout is perfect for relaxed lifestyle.Lots of room to spread out.And views from everywhere! See the ocean from living room,dining room,all the bedrooms..and 4 of the 5 bedrooms has its own bath.Stone Harbor is home to the most beautiful stretch of beach you will find anywhere,& here,it's right at your front door!From this location you can walk to terrific restaurants.Or you can ride a bike or take a drive to the shops on 96th street.Play tennis? The courts are just blocks away. And you are just 35 minutes to the blackjack tables in Atlantic City.Life is Good here at The Beach!

Would you like more information? call me..I Love To Talk Real Estate!
Cell:609.425.7521





htpp://NancyMAlexander.com


Friday, July 25, 2008

Seven Things You Need To Know About Real Estate In New Jersey

New Jersey Association of REALTORS® Sees Opportunity in State's Real Estate Market

(Edison, NJ) New Jersey residents might be surprised to learn that there are many positive aspects about the state's real estate market. Currently, New Jersey real estate market offers many opportunities, evidenced by areas of positive growth including rising median sales prices in some areas of the state, increasing affordability rates and a high average of accumulated home equity, according to statistics presented by the New Jersey Association of REALTORS® (NJAR®).

"There is no doubt that some New Jersey residents are still undecided as to whether now is the right to buy a home," said NJAR® Executive Vice President Jarrod C. Grasso. "By highlighting statewide market information, we're arming the public with the knowledge they need in order to educate themselves and evaluate their housing choices."

Below are seven key facts about New Jersey real estate buyers and sellers should consider when thinking about a real estate transaction.

New Jersey homes have generally maintained their values. National news about tumbling residential real estate prices does not present an accurate picture of New Jersey's local markets. While the national seven year home appreciation rate is 37.8 percent, New Jersey's is more than double that amount at 80.4 percent. Some areas of the state, Bergen, Essex, Mercer, Cape May and Salem counties, saw median price increases in the first quarter of 2008.


The market favors first-time home buyers, who make up 40 percent of the New Jersey market. Buyers currently have many more homes to choose from and are benefitting from mortgage interest rates that are near historic lows. Without having to sell previously-owned property, first-time buyers can also take advantage of the increasing rate of affordability. According to the First Quarter 2008 New Jersey Home Sales Report, New Jersey's housing affordability composite index rose over 100, signifying that a family earning the state median income has the potential to qualify for a mortgage loan on a median-priced home, assuming a 20 percent down payment.


It's also a good time to trade up. Homeowners in need of a larger home might be hesitant about listing their current home in a buyer's market. However, while sellers may have to accept a more realistic price for their current home, the seller of the home they wish to purchase is in the same situation. Realistic pricing is key and REALTORS® familiar with a local market can be invaluable in pricing and marketing your home.


Owning a home builds long-term wealth. Over the last decade, the median prices of homes in almost every metropolitan statistical area that covers the state have more than doubled; illustrating that homeownership is a sound financial investment that historically outperforms the stock market in building long-term wealth. New Jersey home buyers who purchased their homes seven years ago have accumulated an average of $156,300 in home equity.


A home is much more than a nest egg. Despite the tax benefits and financial security which homeownership can provide, a recent survey of New Jersey homeowners revealed that the desire to establish a household and have a place to call their own was the number one reason for buying a home.


New Jersey has a lot going for it. There are many positive economic and market forces in the Garden State that support the long-term health of residential real estate. Reflecting a strong employment market, New Jersey's median income of $64,470 is the second highest in the country. Also, excellent school systems, proximity to New York and Philadelphia, a thriving tourism industry and an extensive transportation infrastructure all enhance the vitality of this area.


There are 53,000 REALTORS® in New Jersey that can provide you with localized information. Nine out of ten home buyers in New Jersey choose to work with a REALTOR® and 86 percent said they would probably work with the REALTOR® again. REALTORS® have a thorough understanding of the dynamics of their local markets and are ready to guide potential homeowners through the process.
These seven things consumers need to know about real estate in New Jersey will be featured in a consumer brochure to be distributed to REALTORS® throughout the state in the coming weeks in order to inform their clients with facts about the state's real estate market. NJAR® is encouraging New Jersey residents to Get the REAL StorySM on real estate in New Jersey with a public education campaign that features an informational website, www.REALstoryNJ.com, designed to assist potential buyers and sellers in learning about New Jersey's real estate market.
www.StoneHarborRealtor.com
Would you like more information? call me..I Love To Talk Real Estate!
Cell:609.425.7521



http://StoneHarborRealtor.com

Friday, July 18, 2008

DID YOU KNOW

Running a sprinkler for two hours can use up to 500 gallons of water. To figure out the right amount to water, put an empty tuna can on your lawn. When it’s full, you’ve watered about the right amount

Source: www.eartheasy.com



The Right Moves

The Right Moves

You found the perfect house, signed on the dotted line and are daydreaming about life in your new home. As moving day looms, it’s also time to think about packing up your many belongings. Have you found enough boxes? How to handle those precious family heirlooms and other breakables? Here are a few tips for making your big day go as smoothly as possible:
Before You Start
• Prioritize your packing list. Consider what you don’t need to take with you, what will need extra packing care and how to best organize your things.
• Estimate how many boxes you’ll need and get them well in advance of moving day. Save newspapers to line boxes.
• Consider investing in moving insurance, which will cover anydamages or breakages during the move.
Getting Under Way
• Start early. Packing always takes longer than you think.
• Begin at the top of the house first and work your way down. Attics are a great place to start sorting.
• Move from room to room, packing and labeling carefully as you go. Clearly mark boxes that contain breakable objects. Be sure to keep all boxes that belong to a certain room together. It will make it much easier when you unpack.
• Newspaper can sometimes leave marks, so wrap your valuables in bubble wrap, blankets or pillows to avoid messy newsprint.
• Keep all of your important documents, such as birth and marriage certificates,
in the same place for easy reference.
Thinking Ahead
• You likely won’t want to shuffle through boxes on your first night in your new home, or you might be traveling long distance and have your household items show up after you’ve arrived. Either way, pack an essentials box containing a change of clothes and toiletries, as well as coffee, tea, snacks, cups, plates and utensils. A small tool kit, first-aid supplies and pen and paper are also important to have on hand.

Fast Fact..

To remove mildew or algae from a wooden deck, use a 50/50 mixture of bleach and water. Any store-brand bleach will work. Rinse the solution off with a garden hose. For brick, use a power washer.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Break The Mold!

Break the Mold
Summer’s here. The
temperature is climbing,
and so is the humidity.
And when humidity levels
exceed 70 percent, it can
create prime conditions for
mold growth in your home.
Outdoors, molds are an important part of the ecosystem, breaking down dead leaves, trees and branches. But indoors, it has no rightful place. Indoor molds, often called black mold, can cause health problems, such as asthma and allergic reactions, and can irritate the eyes, nose, throat and lungs.
In some cases, mold is simple to spot — along windowsills, in the shower or on damp wood. Finding it throughout the rest of your home, however, is not always as easy. It can be hidden behind walls that might have suffered previous water damage, under old flooring or carpets, or within the HVAC system. If you walk into a room that smells especially musty, you’re probably smelling mold.
Determining who should do the cleanup depends on the extent of the mold. If the moldy area is smaller than 3 feet by 3 feet, you can usually handle the job yourself. However, if it’s larger than 3 feet by 3 feet, if there’s a lot of water damage or if you suspect it’s in the HVAC system, hire a contractor who has experience in cleaning mold.
Take precautions if you do the cleanup yourself. Avoid breathing in mold or mold spores. Many hardware stores carry N-95 respirator masks, which catch most mold spores before they enter your breathing space. Wear long gloves that extend to the middle of the forearm to avoid touching the mold with your bare hands and use protective goggles with ventilation holes.
To prevent mold buildup in the future, fix plumbing leaks and other water problems as soon as you notice them, and be sure to dry everything completely.


Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Water,Water,Everywhere

Nothing says summer quite like torrential downpours. And while the rain usually provides much-needed relief from the heat, it also can wreak havoc on your home’s structure.
Detecting leaks early is key, and it can make all the difference between cleanup that requires a simple mop and bucket and having to undergo major construction. Most water problems stem from three areas around your home: leaky roofs, poor drainage around the foundation and clogged gutters or downspouts.
First, it’s important to routinely check your roof for leaks. Missing, curling, broken or cracked shingles can be a warning sign that the roof might need to be repaired. Also take note of any damage or deterioration around chimneys, vents or dips in the roof. Keep your roof free of debris, such as leaves and sticks, and trim trees regularly to prevent them from rubbing against shingles.
Where and how your home is positioned on the property can also affect how well water drains (or doesn’t) from the foundation. Pooling of water around the house can indicate low-lying areas and insufficient drainage. Fill in any of these spots so water flows away from the house and extend downspouts several feet from the foundation to whisk away even more water.
Finally, inspect gutters and downspouts regularly for any debris. Installing gutter shields can help prevent clogs from building up inside the pipe. And if you are frequently away from home, consider installing a water alarm. If the system detects a leak inside the house, such as toilets, faucets or the water meter, it will automatically shut off the water supply to prevent further damage.
Home water leaks only worsen with time, so be sure to conduct routine checks — and if
a problem occurs, address
it sooner rather than later. Everywhere
Nothing says summer quite like torrential downpours. And while the rain usually provides much-needed relief from the heat, it also can wreak havoc on your home’s structure.
Detecting leaks early is key, and it can make all the difference between cleanup that requires a simple mop and bucket and having to undergo major construction. Most water problems stem from three areas around your home: leaky roofs, poor drainage around the foundation and clogged gutters or downspouts.
First, it’s important to routinely check your roof for leaks. Missing, curling, broken or cracked shingles can be a warning sign that the roof might need to be repaired. Also take note of any damage or deterioration around chimneys, vents or dips in the roof. Keep your roof free of debris, such as leaves and sticks, and trim trees regularly to prevent them from rubbing against shingles.
Where and how your home is positioned on the property can also affect how well water drains (or doesn’t) from the foundation. Pooling of water around the house can indicate low-lying areas and insufficient drainage. Fill in any of these spots so water flows away from the house and extend downspouts several feet from the foundation to whisk away even more water.
Finally, inspect gutters and downspouts regularly for any debris. Installing gutter shields can help prevent clogs from building up inside the pipe. And if you are frequently away from home, consider installing a water alarm. If the system detects a leak inside the house, such as toilets, faucets or the water meter, it will automatically shut off the water supply to prevent further damage.
Home water leaks only worsen with time, so be sure to conduct routine checks — and if
a problem occurs, address
it sooner rather than later.
Sources: State Farm Insurance Co.,


Sources: State Farm Insurance Co.,

Sunday, July 6, 2008

Stone Harbor and Avalon Real Estate Sales Activity in The Month of June 2008

Stone Harbor and Avalon Real Estate Snapshot of Real Estate Sales Activity in The Month of June 2008


There are now 100 single family homes on the sale market in Stone Harbor ranging in price from $495,000 up to a whopping $6,500,000. Average time on the market is 250 days.

There were four single family homes which Sold and settled in June with prices ranging from $847,000 to $1,830,000.Average time on the market =263 days

3 single family homes in Stone Harbor went Under Contract in June with price ranging from $849,000 to $1,999,000

There are now 72 Condo/Townhomes for sale in Stone Harbor priced from $225,000 up to $1,899,000 .The average time on the market is 252 days.

2 Condo/Townhomes Sold and settled in June .These Sold for $628,000 and $787,000

One condo went Under Contract in June .This is listed at $749,000 and was on the market for 192 days.

Avalon

There are now 218 single family homes on the sale market in Avalon.
7 single family homes SOLD and Settled in June with prices ranging from $995,000 to $4,300,000. Average time on market =269 days
One single family home went under contract in Avalon in June priced at $1,399,000

There are now 100 condo/townhomes for sale in Avalon ranging from $185,000 to $2,495,000.Average time on the market is 267 days.

6 condos in Avalon went Under Contract in June with prices ranging from $394,990 to $1,499,500
4 Condos SOLD and Settled in June. These ranged in price from $677,500 to
$1,451,500.Average time on the market was 457 days.
Would you like more information? call me..I Love To Talk Real Estate!
Cell:609.425.7521



http://StoneHarborRealtor.com