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Monday, October 31, 2016

11 Tips For Halloween Safety

It's just a few days until Halloween, and you're probably rushing to find the last Pokemon, Size Small in the state and find "the good" candy instead of the jawbreakers and Tootsie Rolls that seem to be the only thing left at Target. But while you fill your mind with costumes and sweets, don't forget to brush up on your Halloween safety. Here are 11 tips you'll want to follow.

1. Let them glow

Glow sticks, necklaces, bracelets, and the like can help make it easier to see your kids on a dark street. You can find a number of different varieties at the Dollar Store. Glow in the Dark duct tape is another cool idea that could help with visibility.

"For an easy solution, have a roll (or two!) of Glow-in-the-Dark Duct Tape on hand for the big night," said Red Tricycle. "You can tape up everyone's buckets, shoes and costumes for a unique look that's easy to see from afar, and it even works on those wagons you'll be using to tote the tiny trick-or-treaters from house to house."

The dark streets and sidewalks can make it hard to see your kids, let alone tell them apart from all the others. Head to the Dollar Store, where you can buy glow necklaces, bracelets, crowns, and various other varieties of light-up items that will help you keep track of them.

2. Discourage running

When kids get hurt on Halloween, it's often because they tripped or fell. No big surprise there, what with all the running in the dark. The best way we've found to curtail it: Threaten to take away their candy. Seriously, it works.

3. Make safe costume choices

Back to the running…accidents also happen because the child's costume is ill-fitting. Step on too-long pants and they could take a tumble down the porch stairs or off the curb into the street. The pants length can be adjusted without having to take them to a tailor (because who has time for that?!). Tuck them into socks or boots, use some masking or duct tape on the inside, or use Stitch Witchery, a fusable tape that allows you to create a hem by bonding it to the fabric with an iron.

US News

Make sure all costumes marked "flame retardant," which is extra important on Halloween since they may be coming into contact with open flames in pumpkins. Well-fitting arms that are not too long are important for the same reason.

When it comes to masks, use your best judgement. If your child's vision is impaired, that could contribute to an injury or other unsafe situation. Masks can also compromise breathing, and may not be suitable for children with asthma.

A new wrinkle this year is anything clown-related. If you've waited until the last minute and all that's left in the store is a red nose and a rainbow wig, trust us: Let it go.

4. Stop the props

The bonus to keeping props at home: You don't have to carry them three minutes after you leave the house.

Many of today's costumes come with accessories - a foam sword here, a princess wand there, and, this year, more Poke balls than you can imagine. Chances are, your kid will carry this prop for about three minutes—just enough for it to become a burden. Then it's yours to deal with. If you already anticipate having to help carry your children's heavy candy bags and pumpkins (and you will), encouraging them to keep the props at home is a good idea.

5. Pick a good candy-carrying bag

There's research that says ongoing use of a heavy backpack could injure a child's back. Will a few hours (or less) carrying a heavy pumpkin or bag filled with pounds of candy do the same? Probably not, but it could make for an unpleasant experience - for all of you. And, it could make the child unsteady and more prone to fall down. Look for a bag with a padded handle that won't dig into their hands or something that has a cross-body strap to better distribute the weight.

6. Don't forget about dinner

Halloween falls on a Monday this year, and that could make rushing home to get dinner together a challenge. This is the perfect time to get out that slow cooker. And make one of these Halloween slow-cooker recipes. Don't want to cook at all? Put in a pizza delivery order early in the day so you're in the system and don't get caught up in a long-wait situation with everyone who called at the last minute.

Full bellies will help your kids to keep their energy up - and their whining down.

NSCC

7. Make sure you can find them

If you don't already have a locator app on your phone, now's the time to add one. If you're in a crowded area with lots of kids around, you want to make sure you can always find them.

"For a little peace of mind (and a few bucks), there are some apps you can download prior to Halloween, so you can keep tabs on everyone in your trick-or-treating crew," said Red Tricycle. "Picniic, a family management dashboard, allows you to track your kid's locations and helps the entire family stay in constant communication by checking in once arriving at a destination. With FamilySignal, this app not only tracks the location of your kids, but it also includes a panic button that will alert you as soon as your child has pushed it. If you know exactly where you're headed on Halloween, the Life360 app allows you to create favorite spots and anytime your child arrives at that location you'll get an automatic notification."

8. Watch the weather

It never fails. Your kids pick out their favorite Halloween gear and then the night before Halloween, a cold front comes through, forcing them to wear a coat over their costumes. If it's going to be frigid while they're out trick-or-treating, some long underwear underneath their costume and a hat might be enough to keep them toasty.

You'll also want to pay attention to weather conditions that could impact their footwear choices. If it's been raining, snowing, or the ground is slick, non-slip shoes will be a necessity.

9. Check their candy

Nobody wants to think about poison or other hazards in their kids Halloween candy, and documented events of poisoning or other tampering with candy are few. But, a few tips to help you know what to look for can help you feel secure. The main takeaways: if it's open, it goes in the trash. Unless you know the people giving out homemade treats and know specifically what's in them, it goes in the trash. Anything else that looks or smells suspicious goes in the trash.

10. Sort through and give away your candy

If you're anything like us, your Halloween haul is going to be impressive. And you probably won't want to keep all that candy in the house. There is a growing number of Halloween candy buyback programs that will pay you per pound of candy turned in, with some donated to families and others sent to the troops overseas.

11. Watch for allergens

While you're sorting through that candy (and, inevitably, putting aside your favorites), beware of allergens. If your child is allergic to peanuts or something else that can be dangerous, you're obviously aware of this. But do you know about teal pumpkins? Looking out for them could help your child get more enjoyment out of the holiday.

"Back in 2012, a Tennessee mom named Becky Basalone had an idea: What if Halloween could be made a little less tricky for kids with food allergies?," said the Chicago Sun-Times.

"Her idea became what is now the Teal Pumpkin Project, a nationwide effort to encourage families - whether their own kids have food restrictions or not - to offer up some non-food treats on Oct. 31. Participation is simple: You just put a teal-colored pumpkin or sign outside your door and offer trick-or-treaters glow sticks, spider rings, Halloween stickers or other non-food goodies, along with or instead of the traditional candies."


Written by Jaymi Naciri



Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Sunday, October 30, 2016

How to Make Your Home Halloween-Friendly For Kids

Most kids will tell you that Halloween is one of their favorite holidays. Of course, the truth is that many adults love decorating and getting their homes into the spirit as well. With the following tips, you can make your home a Halloween-friendly setting that brims with seasonal charm.


Pumpkins and Gourds

You don't have to be a crafty do-it-yourselfer to ramp up the Halloween charm of your home's exterior. Add pumpkins and gourds of various shapes and sizes to your front steps in order to improve your house's seasonal curb appeal. If you don't enjoy carving pumpkins, you can simply paint your pumpkins to reflect spooky faces. Use glow-in-the-dark paint to create eerie eyes and add other simple accents to your pumpkins with odds and ends from around your home.

Front Door Wreath

A seasonal wreath is a simple accent, but it's one that brims with warmth and festive charm. A wreath will greet trick-or-treaters as they come to your door, but it will also make for an inviting focal point for potential buyers if you're planning to list your home on the market this autumn. If you really want to wow the kids, replace your fall wreath with a spooky witch or ghost as it gets closer to Halloween.

Spooky Trees

To rev up the visual appeal of your outdoor setting for Halloween, consider bringing your trees into your design plan. With a bit of fishing line and outdoor-friendly fabric, you can create a troop of ghosts that hang from the low branches of trees on your property. You can also hang other decorations like spider webs, bats and flying witches.

Front Lawn Focal Point

If you're planning to sell your home in the fall, try to avoid installing decor that might take away from the beauty of your setting. But you can still create a Halloween focal point that blends well with your home and landscape. For instance, if you have a birdbath, you might consider replacing it with a cauldron encircled by the silhouettes of witches. The key is to create a sophisticated display that is attractive to both children and potential house buyers.



Eerie Living Room

You can create a haunted living room scene that can also tie the look of this room together. Rather than investing in expensive slipcovers or new furnishings, simply deck your furniture out with clean white sheets to create an eerie setting. Add some flickering, battery-operated candles and cobwebs to create an inviting Halloween setting that will work for you even if you're selling your house.

Garage Door

Don't ignore the blank slate of your garage door when decorating your exterior setting for Halloween. Vinyl clings can help you create a wonderful seasonal display. Consider a bevy of bats or a row of eye-catching jack-o-lanterns to adorn your garage door. Even if you intend to sell your home in the fall, a decorated garage can help you improve your home's curb appeal.

Decorated Windows

Decorating your windows with Halloween decorations can enhance your décor both inside and out. You can add spooky silhouettes to the windows along with some black crepe to create an eye-catching arrangement. If you do have electrical décor, make sure to keep a fire extinguisher close by, just incase.

Halloween Props

Finally, don't forget to add some fun Halloween props to your interior to get into the spirit of the Halloween season. Add some spooky potion bottles to your mantel or shelf, black candles to your candleholders, black flowers to vases and hang fake spiders or ghosts from lighting fixtures. You can also replace your wall hangings with Halloween-inspired pictures that bring a touch of eerie charm to your setting.

Conclusion

Whether you choose to purchase your Halloween decorations or make them yourself, you can enhance the look of your home when you decorate for Halloween. The kids in your neighborhood are sure to appreciate your outdoor décor just as much as your neighbors and potential buyers.

Andrea Davis is the editor for HomeAdvisor, which helps homeowners find home improvement professionals in their area at no charge to ensure the best service in the shortest amount of time.


Written by Andrea Davis


Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Friday, October 28, 2016

Less Is Always More When Staging Your Home

Embrace your inner minimalist when prepping your home for sale. 
Here's a room-by-room guide:

Declutter. Edit your space. Get organized. You've probably heard all sorts of classic advice like this for getting your home sale-ready. But it's helpful to know the goal behind these tips.
By paring down and minimizing distracting elements in your home, you give potential buyers the ability to imagine themselves living inside it. A clutter-free environment allows the space, beauty and intrinsic value of your home to shine. Beautiful wood floor details might be concealed with too much furniture, or pleasant natural light might be obscured by heavy drapery. So edit your home by replacing and eliminating unnecessary, distracting and cumbersome items. Below, we break down this less-is-more approach for each room.

When It Comes to Living Rooms
Keep only essential furniture. The living room is often the most used room of the house, and it may collect extra furniture that isn't typically categorized as living room furniture. The key to staging this space is to stick to just the essential pieces: typically a sofa, coffee table, rug, accent chair and media console.
That corner desk with a computer on it may be essential for the way you live - but it's not great for the room. While your home is on the market, perhaps find an alternate workspace or use a laptop. Similarly, if you need that end table to hold a much-needed table lamp, then leave it. But if you have two end tables, perhaps you don't need both. Having fewer pieces will help the space feel larger.


Living Room

Use only proportional pieces. Once you've edited, ask yourself if the living room feels spacious or cramped. If the living room still feels crowded, consider the size of your furniture. Are any pieces overwhelming for the size of the room? If so, try replacing that oversized piece with something smaller and compact. You might find substitute pieces in other rooms. Or, if the problem is a large sectional sofa, perhaps remove a section. Don't worry about reducing seating. The goal is for the room to read larger so that it appears as a desirable living space.

Place furniture strategically. Next, bring your editing eye to the furniture placement. Are pieces placed in a way that makes the room spacious and bright? For example, if an item is sitting in front of a window, you're likely blocking light. Rearrange to showcase the room's best natural light. Play with the placement, angling pieces, using corners of the room to open up the space.


Larkin Street Residence - John Maniscalco Architecture
Pare down accessories. Next move on to your decorative accessories, including wall art. Do these items detract from the positive features of the room? Try removing all accessories and wall art, then adding back one piece at a time. Stop when the room looks simple, with just a touch of personality. Throw pillows are a good example: While four coordinating ones may make a lovely design statement, using just one or two allows visitors to pull back the focus to the entire room.
You also may want to edit your bookcases, displaying select books with a mixture of neutral accessories. You'll want to remove most framed photos, though it's OK to keep one or two images that are more vintage, such as snapshots of grandparents or an old baby photo. This gives a little life and personality to the room without showcasing your entire family album - a definite "no" in home staging.


Time to Tidy the Kitchen

Keep surfaces clear. Think about those fabulous kitchen showrooms: gleaming counters and stove-tops, organized refrigerators. That's how you want to present your kitchen. Make sure the surfaces are as clear as possible and that every nook and cranny is clean. Keep smaller accessories such as coffee makers to a minimum, and make sure they, too, are spotless.

Organize your cabinets and pantry. People considering purchasing your home will likely look behind closed doors, so give your kitchen cabinets and pantry a good edit. Organize, discard or give away anything messy or that hasn't been used in a while. Make everything in your pantry look more appealing by storing items in inexpensive Mason jars or canisters.

Charmean Neithart Interiors, LLC.
Next, pare down and organize the contents of your refrigerator. Buyers will be paying a lot for your appliances, so make them look appealing. As with the pantry, you might try placing smaller foods such as vegetables in plastic bins. This will not only organize your fridge, but be visually appealing.

Spiff Up the Bedrooms

Remove excess furniture. Furniture in the bedroom adheres to the same principles as the living room. Do you have extra furniture in the room that suits your storage needs but makes the room feel smaller? Keep in mind that what's practical to you might scream "No space!" to someone else. See if you can eliminate any extraneous furniture and storage pieces, finding alternative storage solutions for the items they contain. One option is to use large plastic storage bags under the bed for off-season items. If under the bed isn't possible, perhaps a concealed space such as a closet or the garage will do the trick.

LaFrance Residence Bedroom
Replace oversized beds. Another important guideline is to look at the size of the bed in the room. Specifically, is the bed too large for the space? A common staging faux pas is leaving a king-size bed in a small bedroom. This makes the room feel small, when it might in fact look spacious with a queen-size bed. Another mistake is to leave a queen or full-size bed in a minuscule guest room that's better suited for a pullout sofa.

Edit your accessories. Similar to elsewhere in the house, keep the accessories and knickknacks in bedrooms to a minimum. Try storing everyday sundries in decorative boxes placed on a dresser. To open up the space with wall art, use only minimal coordinating pieces or a mirror.

Show your closet some love. As a final step in the bedrooms, spend some time making closets look, at the very least, neat. Jumbled messes won't make potential buyers want to move in. Quite the opposite. They may feel the mess shows that there isn't enough room in your home to live well. Take the time to edit your closet and be realistic about keeping each and every item. You'll be surprised how much you'll get rid of.


Closet Organizing
Don't forget the kids' rooms. While kids may have many more smaller items like toys, books and school gear, editing their toy chest, closets and shelves ahead of time will prove helpful for your move. Similarly, organizing the items in their rooms in visually appealing containers will present a happy environment to a prospective buyer.

The Final Step: Styling the Bathrooms
Less is definitely more when it comes to staging a bathroom. Buyers don't want to see anything personal. Surfaces should be clear of toiletries. Showers should only show the bare minimum. Opt for a pretty liquid soap dispenser in the shower while you sell your home. Remove any extraneous artwork or knickknacks on shelves. In fact, pare down the bathroom to its bare minimum fixtures and hardware, and, most importantly, clean it until it's gleaming.

Bowery-Downtown Manhattan Residence


Houzz is the leading platform for home remodeling and design, providing people with everything they need to improve their homes from start to finish – online or from a mobile device. From decorating a small room to building a custom home and everything in between, Houzz connects millions of homeowners, home design enthusiasts and home improvement professionals across the country and around the world.
Written by Houzz.com



Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Avalon/Stone Harbor NJ Weekly Update October 27th, 2016


WELCOME HOME JONATHAN SCHWARTZ!  After returning from a six-month deployment at Incirlik Air Force Base in Adana, Turkey, near Syria, Jonathan was welcomed home by an enthusiastic crowd along with a large flag draped across Avalon Boulevard by the Avalon and Stone Harbor Fire Departments.  Jonathan volunteered for the deployment at the base, where air strikes against ISIS were launched.  He has served for five years with the Air National Guard 177th Fighter Wing, Atlantic City.  Welcome home, Jonathan, and thank you for your service!

STONE HARBOR PROPERTY OWNERS will soon receive a notice from Vital Computer Resources explaining the inspection process for an upcoming revaluation.  Property inspections will begin in November and will continue through the spring and summer of 2017.

US COAST GUARD CUTTER TAMAROA will reach her final resting place on October 30th, when she will be sunk to form a reef off Cape May.  It’s the 25th anniversary of the Tamaroa’s rescue of a sailboat’s crew and a downed helicopter off the New England Coast during a storm in 1991, which was later featured in the movie The Perfect Storm. She first saw service in World War II, and was later the first on the scene of the sinking Andrea Dorea.  The Tamaroa reef is expected to support marine life, draw game fish, and help recreational fishing.
US Coast Guard Cutter Tamaroa will be sunk to form an artificial reef off Cape May. (US Coast Guard photo)

THE AVALON SEAWATCH counts migratory seabirds as they make their way southward between September 22ndand December 22nd.  Staffed seven days a week from sunrise to sundown, counters identify and record the species and number of birds flying by.  Based at the seawall at the east end of 7th Street, the location was chosen because Avalon’s north-end projects a mile further seaward than the surrounding area, offering an excellent vantage point.  An average of 800,000 birds are counted each year.

THE SECOND PHASE of back bay dredging in Stone Harbor began on October 7th.  A new dewatering process, which mixes dredge material with Portland cement, is speeding progress, and some dredge material has already been trucked off the island.  Contractor Sevenson Environmental hopes to complete its work by the first week of January.

TRICK OR TREAT Monday evening in Avalon & Stone Harbor, from 5pm to 8pm.  Happy Halloween!

UPCOMING EVENTS:
  • Avalon’s Trunk or Treat, trick or treating at the 30th Street parking lot by Avalon’s Community Hall, 5-7PM,Saturday, October 29
  • Trick or Treating in Avalon & Stone Harbor, 5-8PM, Monday, October 31
  • iPad Workshop, Avalon Public Library, register by calling 609-967-7155, 10AM-Noon, Saturday, November 5
  • Cape May County 8th Annual Disabilities Awareness Day, Avalon Community Hall, 10AM-1PM, Saturday, November 5
  • Corn Husk Fall Wreath Art Workshop, Avalon Public Library, register by calling 609-967-7155, 10AM-1PM,Saturday, November 5
  • Slither & Snore Sleepover, spend a night in the reptile house at the Cape May County Zoo, enjoy a continental breakfast the next morning, 6PM on Saturday, November 5 thru 9AM on Sunday, November 6
  • Big Band Dance featuring Marilyn & the Monroes, Avalon Community Hall, 7PM, Saturday, November 5
  • American Legion Post #331 Veterans’ Day Ceremony, Veterans’ Plaza in Avalon, 11AM, Friday, November 11
  • Stone Harbor American Legion Veterans’ Day Ceremony, 11617 Second Avenue in Stone Harbor, Noon,Friday, November 11
  • Brendan Borek High Tides Memorial Fund Striper Tournament, registration includes a ticket to the Awards Dinner, visit www.brendansfund.org for details, Saturday, November 12
  • Avalon Home & Land Owners Association Meeting, Scott Wahl, Avalon’s Business Manager, will speak on fall plans for the borough of Avalon, Community Hall, 10AM, Saturday, November 12
  • Pirate Day at the Cape May County Zoo, come dressed as a pirate & enjoy treasure hunts, games, stories & photo ops, 11AM-2PM, Saturday, November 12
  • Cape May Traditional Jazz Society presents the Atlantic City Jazz Band, proceeds benefit the Food Bank of Southern Jersey, VFW Post #386, 419 Congress Street, Cape May, 2-4PM, Sunday November 13
  • Creative Writing Seminar, Avalon Public Library, register at 609-967-7155, 10AM-Noon, Saturday, November 19
  • Princess Day at the Cape May County Zoo, come dressed as a princess (or prince!) to enjoy glass slipper hunts, games, sing-a-longs, stories, photo ops, 11AM-2PM, Saturday, November 19
  • Brendan Borek High Tides Memorial Fund Turkey Trot, check in at 8am for a 5K walk, trot or jog, visit www.brendansfund.org for info, Thursday, November 24
  • Story Time for Children with Mrs. Claus, Avalon Public Library, 10-10:45AM, Friday, November 25
  • Stone Harbor’s Island Holiday events including a gala Christmas Parade on Saturday evening at 6:30PM, downtown shopping district, 10AM-9PM, Friday, November 25-Saturday, November 26
  • Avalon’s Festive Friday, Avalon Shopping District’s kick-off of the holiday season, 11AM-6PM, Friday, November 25
  • Avalon’s Festival of Trees, The Whitebrier, Noon-8PM, Friday, November 25
  • Wetlands Institute’s Wetland Wonderland, 9:30AM-3PM, Saturday, November 26
  • Avalon’s Snowfest Saturday, events for the entire family, downtown Avalon, 11AM-4PM, Saturday, November 26

Featured Property:
Beachblock with a pool and a view!


35 E 12 Street, Avalon, $2,195,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172524


New Listings:

665 21st C-B Street, Avalon, $449,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 173014

579 22nd Street, Avalon, $549,900, ACTIVE MLS#: 172999

8120 Third Ave, Stone Harbor, $599,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 173039

3229 Dune Drive, Avalon, $1,150,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172991

3418 Ocean Drive, Avalon, $1,279,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 173018

11008 Second Avenue, Stone Harbor, $1,439,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172957

1249 Avalon Avenue, Avalon, $1,450,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172969

4042 Fourth Avenue, Avalon, $1,450,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 173015

281 71st Street, Avalon, $1,695,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172948

286 76th Street, Avalon, $2,600,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172940

305 74th Street, Avalon, $3,195,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 173023

181 66th Street, Avalon, $4,975,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172992


Properties Sold:

3446 Dune Drive, Avalon, $845,000, SOLD MLS#: 170122

544 20th Street, Avalon, $950,000, SOLD MLS#: 166983

151 94th Street, Stone Harbor, $1,050,000, SOLD MLS#: 166179

104 115th Street, Stone Harbor, $2,932,500, SOLD MLS#: 168297



Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

How-To: Take the Shiver out of a Drafty House

Today's News and Features

(BPT)—A drafty house is not just cold—it’s downright expensive. The kicker? The sources of those drafts can be eliminated inexpensively.

Take the attic, for instance. There was a large hole cut into the ceiling to make way for stairs to it. All of that insulation is now gone, replaced with a thin, unsealed sheet of plywood.

Attics are vented directly outdoors, so they get cold in winter—really cold. What separates your heated home from your cold, un-heated attic? A thin, unsealed sheet of plywood!

Need more proof? Turn the light on in your attic tonight, keeping the stairway closed. See that light streaming through? It’s shining on the gap that is costing you buckets in utilities each winter. Imagine that!



Whole-house fans (which are also installed by way of large hole) can be just as problematic. In this case, a flimsy ceiling shutter is all that stands between you and the elements. Nice.

Fireplaces, ironically, are also drafty—an open damper, even in a well-insulated home, can raise energy consumption by up to 30 percent!

A shut damper isn’t airtight, either. The chimney is an opening to the outdoors—think of it as a window, swallowing up (and out!) all of that costly heated air.

Let’s not forget dryer vents, or exhaust ducts, which can be a source of drafts, too. Most dryer vents employ a sheet metal flapper to reduce drafts—primitive protection, by today’s technology.

The good news is, all of these problems have economical solutions.

• Insulated Attic Stair Cover
• Whole-House Fan Shutter Seal (with Flexible, Textured Insulation, plus Velcro)
• Fireplace Plug
• Dryer Vent Seal (Floating Shuttle)

Winter’s still a few weeks away—get these fixes in now to warm up with all those savings!

Source: Battic Door


Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Monday, October 24, 2016

Why Fall Is Time to Buy—or Sell—a Home

Today's News and Features -
By John Voket

The data have it: October is one of the better months to buy, or sell.

Homebuyers, according to RealtyTrac®, tend to get the best deals in October, based on an analysis of more than 30 million single-family home and condominium sales that happened over the last 15 years—of the 2.7 million sales closed in October over that period, the average sale price was 2.6 percent below average estimated full market value.



Why the downtrend? One of the main causes is lesser demand, which results in lower prices. Another cause could be the presence of “spring leftovers”—the homes that didn’t sell in the spring or summer placed back on the market, at a reduced price, in fall.

Historically, fall has been an ideal season for homebuyers—it lacks the pace of peak real estate season, which can be intimidating (especially to newcomers), and it offers time to buy between the frenetic start of the school year and the holidays. The beginning of school, as well, means that fewer homebuyers will be out searching for homes, lessening the competition for other buyers, and bidding wars, as a result.

Still, fall can be ideal for those on the other side of the closing table—sellers. Sellers in the fall generally attract more serious buyers than at other times of year, upping the chance they’ll get a well-intentioned offer. They also could be on a faster path to closing, as well, because fall is outside of peak season—some buyers, then, may have a pressing reason to buy.

October, specifically, is also ideal for both parties in that appliances go on sale—manufacturers deeply discount previous years’ models to make way for the next years’ hitting the shelves. How about that for incentive?

Whether it’s spring, summer, fall or winter, I’m prepared to help you with your real estate needs. Contact me today!



Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Friday, October 21, 2016

When's the Last Time You Really Cleaned Your Kitchen?

Today's News and Features


Your appliances and counters are sparkling, and your cabinets and floors are polished to a shine—but how clean are some lesser-seen areas of your kitchen?

Joe Sevier of Epicurious.com consulted with kitchen experts to get the low-down on areas of the kitchen we may be overlooking when it comes to cleaning. Here’s a list of what needs to be cleaned—and how frequently, too—from Sevier’s blog. You may be surprised!




Cleaning Brush – Daily (Rinse in hot water after each use.)

Dish Drying Rack – Weekly

Garbage Bin – Monthly

Kitchen Cabinets – Monthly (Wipe down fronts and knobs, and vacuum the inside.)

In-Drawer Flatware Caddy – Monthly (If you have a wire or mesh caddy, remove and vacuum debris that filtered down to the drawer.)

Refrigerator Shelves – Monthly (Tip: Wiping the bottom of jars and cartons will keep shelves cleaner, longer.)

Stovetop Exhaust Fan – Monthly

Utensil Caddy – Monthly, to remove food splatters, dust and grease

Water Filterer – Follow the manufacturer’s instructions, but generally, it should be cleaned every two months when you change the filter.

Ice Cube Trays – Once or twice a year if you use them regularly, but more often if you only use them once in a while

Source: Epicurious.com


Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Avalon/Stone Harbor NJ Weekly Update October 20th, 2016



SEPTEMBER’S MEDIAN SALE PRICE in the local market increased to $1,200,000, up 3.6% over September 2015.  The number of active listings decreased slightly versus a year ago, as did the average number of “days on market.”  For the full Long & Foster Market Minute report click here: http://marketminute.longandfoster.com/Market-Minute/NJ/Avalon-Stone-Harbor.pdf  Ready to find your own place at the shore?  Please call me!
Click above for Long & Foster’s latest Market Minute report.

AERIAL DUNE GRASS FERTILIZATION is planned in Avalon and Stone Harbor on Thursday, October 20th. The operation is expected to take place in the morning, finishing around 11am.  Recently volunteers planted additional dune grass in Avalon’s dune system.

BEACH SWEEPS will be conducted in Avalon & Stone Harbor this weekend.  Volunteers are needed to assist with cleanup efforts in both towns on Saturday from 9am to 12:30pm.  In Stone Harbor, volunteers are asked to report to the 95th Street beach; in Avalon volunteers are asked to report to the 80th Street beach.  Volunteers will be provided with trash bags, gloves, and datasheets.

DID YOU SEE IT?  Monday evening an Antares rocket was launched from Wallop’s Island, Virginia, after several days of launch delays.  The rockets fiery trail was visible to sky watchers all over South Jersey, with Cape May County’s beaches offering some of the best views.  After arcing into the sky for a few minutes it suddenly went dark, then became visible again as the rocket’s second stage began.

The latter part of the Antares rocket’s initial burn is visible in this photo, looking southward from Ocean City’s 9th Street causeway. 


THIS WEEK’S WEATHER has been super, with daytime temperatures in the 70s and 80s, along with gentle breezes and clear skies.  Occasional showers are expected late in the week, with cooler, dryer air moving in for the weekend.  Enjoy the fall weather while it lasts!

UPCOMING EVENTS:
  • Adults Only Night Walk at the Cape May County Zoo, quiet after hours tour of the zoo, 6:30-8:30PM, Friday, October 21
  • Boo at the Cape May County Zoo, family friendly free events, costume contest, craft stations, magic show, more, 10AM-2PM,Saturday, October 22
  • Avalon Police Department Prescription Drug Take Back Day, Public Safety Building, 10AM-2PM, Saturday, October 22
  • Stone Harbor’s Harvest Festival, 96th Street Shopping District, hayrides, pumpkin decorating, animals, trick or treating in the shops, more, 11AM-5PM, Saturday, October 22
  • Snow Leopard Day at the Cape May County Zoo, snow leopard related programs, activities & zookeeper talks, 11AM-2PM,Sunday, October 23
  • Avalon’s Trunk or Treat, trick or treating at the 30th Street parking lot by Avalon’s Community Hall, 5-7PM, Saturday, October 29
  • Trick or Treating in Avalon & Stone Harbor, 5-8PM, Monday, October 31
  • IPad Workshop, Avalon Public Library, register by calling 609-967-7155, 10AM-Noon, Saturday, November 5
  • Corn Husk Fall Wreath Art Workshop, Avalon Public Library, register by calling 609-967-7155, 10AM-1PM, Saturday, November 5
  • Slither & Snore Sleepover, spend a night in the reptile house at the Cape May County Zoo, enjoy a continental breakfast the next morning, 6PM on Saturday, November 5 thru 9AM on Sunday, November 6
  • Big Band Dance featuring Marilyn & the Monroes, Avalon Community Hall, 7PM, Saturday, November 5
  • American Legion Post #331 Veterans’ Day Ceremony, Veterans’ Plaza in Avalon, 11AM, Friday, November 11
  • Stone Harbor American Legion Veterans’ Day Ceremony, 11617 Second Avenue in Stone Harbor, Noon, Friday, November 11
  • Brendan Borek High Tides Memorial Fund Striper Tournament, registration includes a ticket to the Awards Dinner, visitwww.brendansfund.org for details, Saturday, November 12
  • Avalon Home & Land Owners Association Meeting, Scott Wahl, Avalon’s Business Manager, will speak on fall plans for the borough of Avalon, Community Hall, 10AM, Saturday, November 12
  • Cape May Traditional Jazz Society presents the Atlantic City Jazz Band, proceeds benefit the Food Bank of Southern Jersey, VFW Post #386, 419 Congress Street, Cape May, 2-4PM, Sunday November 13
  • Creative Writing Seminar, Avalon Public Library, register at 609-967-7155, 10AM-Noon, Saturday, November 19
  • Brendan Borek High Tides Memorial Fund Turkey Trot, check in at 8am for a 5K walk, trot or jog, visit www.brendansfund.orgfor info, Thursday, November 24
  • Story Time for Children with Mrs. Claus, Avalon Public Library, 10-10:45AM, Friday, November 25
  • Stone Harbor’s Island Holiday events including a gala Christmas Parade on Saturday evening at 6:30PM, downtown shopping district, 10AM-9PM, Friday, November 25-Saturday, November 26
  • Avalon’s Festive Friday, Avalon Shopping District’s kick-off of the holiday season, 11AM-6PM, Friday, November 25
  • Avalon’s Festival of Trees, The Whitebrier, Noon-8PM, Friday, November 25
  • Wetlands Institute’s Wetland Wonderland, 9:30AM-3PM, Saturday, November 26
  • Avalon’s Snowfest Saturday, events for the entire family, downtown Avalon, 11AM-4PM, Saturday, November 26

Featured Property:

Brand new for the 2017 season!

792 Sunrise Drive, Avalon, $1,095,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172721


New Listings:

7900 Dune Drive, Avalon, $189,900, ACTIVE MLS#: 172893

66 E 20th Street Street, Avalon, $650,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172910

343 92nd Street, Stone Harbor, $1,049,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172869

9815-17 Corinthian Drive, Stone Harbor, $1,099,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172894

362 93rd Street, Stone Harbor, $1,175,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172902

8626 Sunset Drive, Stone Harbor, $1,295,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172929

148 104th Street Street, Stone Harbor, $1,699,500, ACTIVE MLS#: 172915

9315 Sunset Drive, Stone Harbor, $1,799,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172912

4515 Fourth Avenue, Avalon, $1,890,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172872

302 42nd Street, Avalon, $1,995,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172919


Properties Sold:

22 Linden Lane, Stone Harbor, $425,000, SOLD MLS#: 169049

29 Marine Way, Avalon, $995,000, SOLD MLS#: 171893

344 89th, Stone Harbor, $1,440,000, SOLD MLS#: 168495

202 75th Street, Avalon, $1,500,000, SOLD MLS#: 168636

507 20th Street, Avalon, $1,560,000, SOLD MLS#: 170951

2888 Ocean Drive, Avalon, $1,600,000, SOLD MLS#: 169426

271 45th Street, Avalon, $1,635,000, SOLD MLS#: 166756

407 20th Street, Avalon, $1,725,000, SOLD MLS#: 169311

141 20th Street, Avalon, $1,940,000, SOLD MLS#: 171272

45 E 11th Street, Avalon, $2,160,000, SOLD MLS#: 166564

26 E 14th Street, Avalon, $2,600,000, SOLD MLS#: 171774





Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Staging for Millennial Appeal

Today's News and Features

By John Voket

Millennials—the generation born between 1980 and 1995 that now comprise the largest home-buying group—want made-up, modern, and move-in ready.

Real estate professionals are seeing it firsthand: most millennials don’t want their parents’ house, but older homes tend to look just like mom and dad’s—a harsh truth for homeowners needing to appeal to these types of buyers when they list their home for sale.

According to the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR), millennials accounted for 35 percent of all home sales last year. Sellers unreceptive to staging could miss that opportunity entirely. Comparable homes staged for millennials, too, tend to fetch more than ones that aren’t—that means even if an older buyer places an offer, that offer will likely be on par with market value or higher.



The fact is, millennials don’t have the desire, money or time to fix up a home themselves. These days, bold colors, clean-lined furniture and light walls are not enough to pique their interest—one blogger called the aesthetic they’re after the “this-could-be-a-movie-set” look. Millennials want to project a lifestyle in the places they call home. Sellers should aim to meet them on those terms.

Stagers generally recommend starting by removing outdated décor—this can make a positive difference in the impression millennial buyers receive. Contemporary light fixtures, hardwood flooring and updated window treatments can dramatically change the appearance of the home, as well. Few, strategic fixes like these can sell a home for top dollar, and that much sooner.

Every house, however, is unique. A real estate professional well-versed in staging is worth consulting—most will walk the home and offer suggestions as to the improvements needed to make the home attractive to not only millennials, but all types of buyers. Contact one today!


Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The 3 Factors That Have the Biggest Impact on Your Home Insurance

Although your homeowner's insurance may seem like an unnecessary expense at times, it is an invaluable safeguard.

Property and casualty risk research firm ISO -- Verisk Analytics states 5.3 percent of all insured homes made a claim in 2014. In addition, the Insurance Information Institute (III) and SNL Financial reported that the incurred losses for homeowner's insurance in the United States totaled $39.84 billion in 2014. This data indicates that even though only a small percentage of homeowners submit home insurance claims, the overall costs associated with these claims can be substantial.

Clearly, home insurance can make a world of difference for homeowners, but that does not mean you should be forced to break the bank to find the proper coverage.

If you understand the factors that impact your home insurance, you should have no trouble picking up the right coverage at the right price. Ultimately, you'll be able to insure your home against a wide range of risks for a reasonable cost.

Here's a closer look at three factors that have the biggest impact on your home insurance.



1. Your Home's Value

Consider the price of your house as well as the total cost it would take to rebuild your residence as you study home insurance options.

Remember, if your home is damaged or destroyed, you'll want to be insured for the full cost to replace your residence. In many cases, this cost will exceed the price you paid for your home, so you should purchase a policy that guarantees you're fully covered against any damage or destruction.

To determine the replacement cost of your home, get an estimate from a reputable builder who can evaluate your current residence and give you an accurate idea of how much it would cost to replace your house. After a builder's evaluation of your home, you'll be able to insure your residence accordingly.

2. Your Home's Location

Location is everything. From the town or city where you live to the number of fire stations near your house, many factors associated with your home's location can affect your home insurance.

Some of the key factors linked to your home's location that can impact your home insurance include:


  • Fire Protection -- Insurers frequently use Public Protection Classification (PPC) grades to measure the fire protection capability of local fire departments.
  • Wind Storms -- III points out that many insurers in coastal states along the Atlantic seaboard and Gulf of Mexico provide homeowner's insurance with percentage deductibles for hurricane damage instead of traditional dollar deductibles. This means that some homeowners may end up paying higher deductibles due to wind storm dangers.
  • Crime -- Risk is lower for homeowners in low-crime areas. Thus, these homeowners often pay less for home insurance than those who live in high-crime areas.

Performing research about your home's location is paramount. If you spend some time learning about risks related to your home's location, you can make sure your home is adequately insured.


3. Your Home's Condition

The age and condition of your home may affect your homeowners insurance, but it is also important to recognize that the design of your residence may impact your home insurance.

For example, a home that features a custom design with many exterior corners may be more expensive to replace than a residence with a simpler design. Therefore, the price to insure the former may be more expensive than the cost to insure the latter.

Insurance companies also consider what's called "morale hazard" when deciding to offer you coverage or not, which is an increase in the risk of hazards caused by a person's apathy due to having insurance. Because of this, maintaining the condition of your home can make you more attractive to insurers. If you fail to perform regular home maintenance, your insurer may have the right to void your coverage in the event of damage or destruction to your residence.

The aforementioned factors will likely have the biggest impact on your home insurance. Furthermore, many insurers now review your credit score to perform a predictive analysis of your risk levels.

Your credit score is affected by a number of factors, including:


  • Payment history
  • Credit report inquiries
  • New and existing credit accounts

A higher credit score means a lower risk. However, if you pay your bills on time, avoid excessive credit card debt and understand your credit history, you may be able to lower your home insurance costs.

You're entitled to a free copy of your credit report from each of the three major credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) once a year. Request a copy of your credit report from these bureaus annually and you'll be able to identify any credit report issues that could affect your home insurance.

Lastly, don't forget to work with an insurance agent as you explore your home insurance options. These professionals will help you identify risks and guarantee you can protect your home against loss both now and in the future.

Ryan Hanley is the Vice President of Marketing at TrustedChoice.com and the Managing Editor of Agency Nation. He is also a speaker, podcaster and author of the Amazon best-seller, "Content Warfare." Ryan has over 12 years of insurance expertise and blogs frequently to help consumers understand complicated insurance topics.


Written by Ryan Hanley



Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

A Hurricane Damaged My Home—Now What?

Today's News and Features

Anyone whose home’s been damaged by a hurricane knows the days following the storm can be hazy.

The first and most important step to take after the storm is contacting your insurance provider to begin the claim filing process. It’s important to do this as soon as you’re able, according to the Consumer Federation of America (CFA), but to tread carefully when doing so.


“Families will have to dig deeper into their pockets, because insurers have been steadily increasing hurricane wind coverage deductibles and imposing other policy limitations,” said J. Robert Hunter, director of Insurance for CFA, in a statement on Hurricane Matthew, the most recent storm. “This liability shift to consumers may take some by surprise, since disclosures are often buried in renewal paperwork that consumers may not understand or even read.”

It’s important, according to CFA, to keep records of each event in the claims process, especially when making a claim due to a major catastrophe. Keep your claim number handy, and hold on to receipts for repair work or temporary housing. Record brief notes, including dates and times, of all communications with your insurer. Take stock of your belongings as best you can—having a list will help expedite the claims process.

In the meantime, take steps to prepare for the insurance adjustment, CFA recommends. Be sure to get estimates from a few local, reputable contractors for reference before the adjuster arrives to assess the damage—and, remember, you’re not obligated to use a contractor recommended by your insurer. Clarify whether the adjuster is an independent professional or an employee of the insurer—if the former, confirm they’re authorized by the insurer to make decisions related to your claim.

Remain vigilant through the process, as well. Though flooding is not covered by standard homeowners insurance policies, some insurers employ an “anti-concurrent-causation” clause—this means that the insurer will not cover wind damage if flooding occurred concurrently, or at the same time, according to CFA. (Your claim may be denied because of this clause—if that’s the case, consult with an attorney, CFA advises.) Some insurers may also unfairly categorize losses as the result of flooding, rather than high winds.

“Because so many consumers experienced claims problems in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy, we urge homeowners dealing with losses caused by Hurricane Matthew to be vigilant with their insurance companies to ensure that they receive a full and fair settlement,” Hunter said.

However, “not all insurance companies handle claims badly, so go into the claims process with an open mind,” Hunter added.

Source: Consumer Federation of America (CFA)



Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Monday, October 17, 2016

ICYMI Aug 2016 Luxury Housing Market Update - Long & Foster Real Estate, Lux Insight

LUXURY HOUSING MARKET UPDATE - AUGUST 2016 Cape May County


Compared to last August, the total number of homes more than $1 Million available this month was lower by 5.3% and lower by 17.0% compared to August 2014. Active inventory this August was 5.1% lower than the previous month’s supply of available inventory.







Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Friday, October 14, 2016

Top Five Mistakes Sellers Make


It can be a tough market for selling a home, but those conditions can get even worse if sellers aren't careful. While a seller doesn't control the real estate market, his actions can significantly contribute to how long and how much their home is sold for.



Underestimating Cleaning Up: It may seem obvious, but real estate agents everywhere are nodding their heads in agreement as they read this. Inviting potential buyers in to see an unkempt home is like going on a job interview without freshening up after you cleaned your garage. How can the employer notice your fantastic talents and skills if they're hidden underneath a sloppy exterior? How you show your home tells the buyer what type of care you, the seller, has put into the home?

If you can't take the time to wipe the grime off the refrigerator doors, tidy up the kids' rooms, take out the messy diapers, put away the food, and take the dogs out of the house for a while, then you'll likely find buyers will quickly move on to the next home on their list.

Lingering During Showings: Yes, we all want to know how the open house or showing went, but hanging around during either of those events is not a good idea. Sellers who tend to linger during showings often make the buyers uncomfortable. Buyers like to have time to explore the home at their own pace and without feeling any pressure. Sometimes buyers want to sit on the porch or out in the backyard as they discuss the home's possibilities. And if buyers are willing to sit for a bit and talk about the home, that's a great sign. However, the chances of their doing that with the seller present is unlikely. Many times buyers will say, "Let's skip the home if the sellers are there."

If you're selling your home, do yourself a favor and hit the road. Take a walk or head to the coffee shop. As soon as the showing is over, you can get all the details from your agent. That's why you're paying your agent! Let him do his job. Just make sure that your agent has all the home's selling points and any additional features that make this home standout.

For Sale By Owner (FSBO) Trap: Some people are convinced that they can do it on their own. Maybe they can sell their own home, but it likely won't happen without some headaches. Trained specialists are called "experts" for a reason. An expert real estate agent knows the market, has connections, guides you through the process, negotiates on your behalf, and will make the process of selling your home simpler.

One potential land mine that FSBOs face is the flood of people popping in to see their home. It sounds great that there's so much traffic, but the problem is that many times the people who pop into FSBO properties aren't actually qualified for a mortgage or may not be serious buyers. Instead they're just looking and satisfying their curiosity at your expense. Agents know to ask the right questions to make certain the lookers are truly potential home buyers.

Not interviewing agents: If you have kids, chances are you interviewed the nanny or babysitter. Take the time to seek out top real estate agents in your area. Setting up interviews with them is equally important. Choosing the wrong agent for the job will be a headache and slow the process down. There must be a connection, an understanding, and good communication between the seller and the agent. There are many things that go on during the sale of a home. Communicating with the agent should be one of the easier tasks.

Pricing a home incorrectly: This could be the worst mistake sellers make. Yet, this is where so much help can be found. Real estate agents see homes every single day. They know the neighborhoods and the comps. They are there to help you understand what homes have sold for in the recent past and what they'll likely sell for during the current market conditions. Get a market evaluation from your agent and understand what is a fair price for your home in today's market.


Written by Phoebe Chongchua


Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Avalon/Stone Harbor NJ Weekly Update October 13th, 2016


SEA TURTLE UPDATE:  A sea turtle rescued from Avalon’s north-end beach is finally eating at the Marine Mammal Stranding Center, after refusing to do so initially.  Now that she’s eating, she can be transferred to another facility for further rehab.  She’d been scheduled for an Air Force transport flight to the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center in North Carolina, but the flight was postponed due to weather brought on by Hurricane Matthew. 

TWO STONE HARBOR BRIDGES will close temporarily for inspections next week.  The Ocean Drive Bridge linking Stone Harbor to Nummy Island, locally known as “the free bridge” due to its lack of a toll booth, will close to automotive and marine traffic intermittently between 9am and 1pm on October 19th.  The following day the 96th Street Bridge will experience intermittent closures as well.  (See the nautical chart image below to find Nummy Island!)

AVALON is considering a monthly stipend to help increase firefighter response rates during the overnight hours.  As Avalon’s population has aged and property values have increased, fewer firefighters live in town, with more choosing to reside offshore.    Chief Ed Dean has proposed a maximum $400 per month stipend for firefighters who staff four overnight shifts at the firehouse.  Stone Harbor and Sea Isle City fire departments have similar programs that have increased turnout, while costing the towns far less than staffing paid fire departments.
  
Seven Mile Beach as depicted in NOAA Nautical Chart 12316.  This type of chart is used by boaters to navigate the IntraCoastal Waterway, marked by red triangles and green squares.  Modern GPS navigation units have electronic charts built in.

IT’S A BIRD, IT’S A PLANE…it’s an Antares Rocket!  The fifth such rocket will be launched from Wallops Island, Virginia at 8:03pm Sunday evening.  New Jersey’s coastal areas could have a good view of the launch, depending upon weather, as the rocket’s exhaust trail should be visible from the beach.  The scheduled launches are frequently postponed though, so check  https://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/home for the latest launch updates from NASA.

BOO AT THE ZOO returns to the Cape May County Zoo on Saturday, October 22 from 10am to 2pm.   The free family-friendly event includes a costume contest, crafts, children’s amusement rides, a magic show, and more.  The annual event is a big hit with kids young and old!   Visit www.cmczoo.com for more info on the event, or other zoo programs!

UPCOMING EVENTS:
  • Lighthouse Challenge of NJ Weekend, tour the state & visit as many lighthouses as you can with some offering night climbs, visit lighthousechallengenj.org for details, Saturday & Sunday, October 15 & 16
  • South Jersey District Surfing Contest, call 609-884-5277 for info, Sea Isle City’s 40th Street Beach, 7AM-5PMSaturday, October 15
  • Creative Writing Seminar, Avalon Public Library, register at 609-967-715510AM-NoonSaturday, October 15
  • Miss Avalon Pageant, Avalon Elementary School, 6PMSaturday, October 15
  • Seashell Sunday at the Wetlands Institute, hands-on exhibits, learning & fun, 12:30PMSunday, October 16
  • Avalon Lions’ Club Pasta Night, Windrift Hotel at 80th Street & the beach, 4:30-7:30PMSunday, October 16
  • Full Moon Climb at the Cape May Lighthouse, located at Cape May Point State Park in Lower Township, 800-275-4278 for info, 8-10PMSunday, October 16
  • Adults Only Night Walk at the Cape May County Zoo, quiet after hours tour of the zoo, 6:30-8:30PMFriday, October 21
  • Boo at the Cape May County Zoo, family friendly free events, costume contest, craft stations, magic show, more, 10AM-2PMSaturday, October 22
  • Avalon Police Department Prescription Drug Take Back Day, Public Safety Building, 10AM-2PMSaturday, October 22
  • Stone Harbor’s Harvest Festival, 96th Street Shopping District, hayrides, trick or treating in the shops, more, 11AM-5PMSaturday, October 22
  • Snow Leopard Day at the Cape May County Zoo, snow leopard related programs, activities & zookeeper talks, 11AM-2PMSunday, October 23
  • Avalon’s Trunk or Treat, trick or treating at the 30th Street parking lot by Avalon’s Community Hall, 5-7PMSaturday, October 29
  • Trick or Treating in Avalon & Stone Harbor, 5-8PMMonday, October 31
  • IPad Workshop, Avalon Public Library, register by calling 609-967-715510AM-NoonSaturday, November 5
  • Corn Husk Fall Wreath Art Workshop, Avalon Public Library, register by calling 609-967-715510AM-1PMSaturday, November 5
  • Slither & Snore Sleepover, spend a night in the reptile house at the Cape May County Zoo, enjoy a continental breakfast the next morning, 6PM on Saturday, November 5 thru 9AM on Sunday, November 6
  • Big Band Dance featuring Marilyn & the Monroes, Avalon Community Hall, 7PMSaturday, November 5
  • American Legion Post #331 Veterans’ Day Ceremony, Veterans’ Plaza in Avalon, 11AMFriday, November 11
  • Stone Harbor American Legion Veterans’ Day Ceremony, 11617 Second Avenue in Stone Harbor, NoonFriday, November 11
  • Stone Harbor’s Island Holiday events including a gala Christmas Parade on Saturday evening, downtown shopping district, 10AM-9PMFriday, November 25-Saturday, November 26
  • Avalon’s Festive Friday, Avalon Shopping District’s kick-off of the holiday season, 11AM-6PMFriday, November 25
  • Avalon’s Festival of Trees, The Whitebrier, Noon-9PMFriday, November 25
  • Wetlands Institute’s Wetland Wonderland, 9:30AM-3PMSaturday, November 26
  • Avalon’s Snowfest Saturday, events for the entire family, downtown Avalon, 11AM-4PMSaturday, November 26

Featured Property:

 This gorgeous Bayfront property is just a few blocks from Stone Harbor’s shopping district!
 308 92nd Street, Stone Harbor, $3,695,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 171930


New Listings:

107 30th Street, Avalon, $439,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172718

301 80th Street, Avalon, $599,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172746

792 Sunrise Drive, Avalon, $1,095,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172721

294 48th Street, Avalon, $1,395,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172688

7589 Ocean Drive, Avalon, $1,899,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172738

160 84th Street, Stone Harbor, $2,595,000, ACTIVE MLS#: 172750


Properties Sold:

4021 Fourth Ave, Avalon, $510,000, SOLD MLS#: 171181

1318 Ocean Drive, Avalon, $640,000, SOLD MLS#: 167460

36 W 18th Street, Avalon, $1,200,000, SOLD MLS#: 171150

250 107th Street, Stone Harbor, $1,225,000, SOLD MLS#: 162635

160 84th Street, Stone Harbor, $1,250,000, SOLD MLS#: 170684

699 Sunrise Drive, Avalon, $1,385,000, SOLD MLS#: 168996

160 27th Street, Avalon, $1,425,000, SOLD MLS#: 170850

245 65th Street, Avalon, $1,550,000, SOLD MLS#: 170368

8525 Sunset Drive, Stone Harbor, $1,612,500, SOLD MLS#: 170075

271 45th Street, Avalon, $1,635,000, SOLD MLS#: 166756

6063 Ocean Drive, Avalon, $1,825,000, SOLD MLS#: 169167

114 110th Street, Stone Harbor, $2,925,000, SOLD MLS#: 168140




Nancy M. Alexander Stone Harbor and Avalon NJ Real Estate, Long & Foster Avalon